• Celebrity
    Yahoo Life

    Woman posts photos of herself in bikini and engineering uniform to show ‘girls can do both’

    Caitlin Sarian felt the need to respond to a post comparing Kendall Jenner and Alyssa Carson, but didn't expect the response.

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  • Celebrity
    The Week

    Papa John's founder says he's been working to get the N-word out of his vocabulary for the 'last 20 months'

    The former CEO of Papa John's is assuring the public he's been working on not using racist language, an effort that has apparently been ongoing for nearly two years. John Schnatter, the Papa John's founder who in 2018 stepped down as chairman after admitting he used the N-word during a conference call, told One America News Network the pizza chain's board has painted him "as a racist" when "they know he's not a racist," per Mediaite. From there, Schnatter described his "goals," evidently including no longer saying racial slurs. "We've had three goals for the last 20 months," Schnatter said. "To get rid of this N-word in my vocabulary and dictionary and everything else, because it's just not true, figure out how they did this, and get on with my life." The former pizza boss also told OANN he "used to lay in bed" after his ouster wondering "how did they do this," and he called on Papa John's to come out and declare that it "didn't follow proper due diligence" and that he actually "has no history of racism." Schnatter stepped down as Papa John's chair after Forbes reported that he "used the N-word on a conference call" that had been "designed as a role-playing exercise for Schnatter in an effort to prevent future public-relations snafus." He apologized at the time, saying "racism has no place in our society." Shortly after, though, Schnatter said he resigned because the board asked him to "without apparently doing any investigation" and that he now regrets doing so. Later, Schnatter would vow that a "day of reckoning" would come in a bizarre 2019 interview, in which he also famously declared he's eaten "over 40 pizzas in the last 30 days." Update: In a statement on Monday, Schnatter said he has been seeking to eliminate "false perceptions in the media" and that "on OANN, I tried to say, 'Get rid of this n-word in (the) vocabulary and dictionary (of the news media), and everything else because it's just not true,' – reflecting my commitment to correct the false and malicious reporting by the news media about the conference call." Papa John’s ex-CEO says he’s been working for the last 20 months “to get rid of this N-word in my vocabulary” (h/t @mount_bees) pic.twitter.com/8heITnJJxA — philip lewis (@Phil_Lewis_) March 8, 2021 More stories from theweek.comBiden administration offers temporary protected status to VenezuelansBritain's tabloids, vilified by Harry and Meghan, are all agog over the 'devastating' Oprah interview7 spondiferously funny cartoons about the Dr. Seuss controversy

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  • Business
    Bloomberg

    Powell’s Dashboard Shows How Far U.S. Economy Has to Go on Jobs

    (Bloomberg) -- Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says he and his colleagues have learned a lot over the last decade about the meaning of full employment. Now, they’re looking at a new set of labor-market indicators as they chart a recovery from the steepest economic downturn on record.Call it the Powell dashboard.The Fed chair has recently highlighted several data points that underscore the central bank’s shift in focus beyond headline numbers and toward the most vulnerable sections of the workforce. It’s an important development for Fed watchers to grasp in gauging how long policy makers will keep interest rates near zero as they judge incoming data, including Friday’s jobs report.The approach marks an evolution from that of Powell’s immediate predecessor, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, who maintained a “dashboard” of metrics to help determine remaining slack in the labor market created by the Great Recession. It focused Fed-watchers on an array of statistics like job openings, layoffs, underemployment and long-term joblessness that applied to the entire labor force.By comparison, the statistics on Powell’s list home in on things like Black unemployment, wage growth for low-wage workers and labor force participation for those without college degrees, categories that historically have taken longer to recover from downturns than broader metrics.“It’s a pretty notable change,” said Seth Carpenter, a former Fed official who is now chief U.S. economist at UBS. The new definition of full employment reflects a growing understanding among policy makers that they can’t conclude the economy has reached such a state until “you really are starting to see businesses compete for workers at every part of the income distribution,” he said.Here are some of the numbers Powell is watching that underscore the challenges ahead:Black UnemploymentCovid sent Black unemployment surging to 16.7% in April and May of last year. By January it had recovered to 9.2%. But it reversed some of that progress last month, rising to 9.9%, according to Labor Department figures published Friday.The Fed has faced growing pressure to acknowledge the uneven expansion in recent years, and the experience of the pandemic has only added to it. Powell has repeatedly said he wants to see broad-based gains in employment, and not just in the aggregate or at the median. In August, the Fed announced changes to its monetary policy strategy to codify a more inclusive approach.The long economic expansion that preceded the pandemic continually defied forecasts of accelerating inflation even as unemployment dwindled, indicating potential for further labor-market gains. By mid-2019, Black unemployment had fallen to 5.2% -- a record low in nearly a half-century of data.During the financial crisis of 2008, Fed officials cut their benchmark interest rate to nearly zero, and didn’t begin raising it until December 2015. By then, the overall unemployment rate had recovered from a high of 10% to just 5%. But they didn’t take into account the unemployment rate for Black Americans, which at the time stood at 9.4%.Low-Wage EarningsAs Fed chair, Yellen often cited wage growth as a metric for judging progress toward full employment, including a measure produced by the Atlanta Fed in her dashboard.In a Feb. 10 speech, Powell cited pay for the bottom 25% of earners in particular. Just before the onset of the pandemic in the U.S., wage growth for this group of workers was 4.7% on a 12-month average basis, according to the Atlanta Fed. That marked its highest rate relative to overall wage growth since the late 1990s.By January of this year, the latest month for which data are available, it had moderated to 4%. In the wake of both the 2001 and the 2007-09 downturns, earnings growth for the lowest wage quartile took almost three years to bottom out.No CollegePowell has also highlighted labor force participation rates specifically for those without college educations. The pandemic has had an outsize effect on them. As of last month, their participation rate was just 54.7%, according to the Labor Department figures published Friday.Compare that with February 2020, when it stood at 58.3%, up from a low of 56.9% in 2015.The magnitude of job losses during the Great Recession made the recovery from it a slow process. Many individuals looking for work eventually became discouraged and gave up, leading them to stop being counted as unemployed.Under Yellen, the Fed elevated the labor force participation rate in its analysis of the state of employment to account for the likelihood that many of the so-called labor-force dropouts would take jobs if work was available. But the slow pace of recovery fanned arguments among policy makers over whether everyone who had lost work -- especially the least-educated -- would be able to find new employment and should therefore be counted in the shortfall.In 2015, the year Yellen’s Fed began raising rates, “many forecasters worried that globalization and technological change might have permanently reduced job opportunities for these individuals, and that, as a result, there might be limited scope for participation to recover,” Powell said in his Feb. 10 speech.But the next five years proved them wrong as those without college degrees were increasingly drawn back into the workforce.As the Fed chair put it during an event on March 4: “Today, we’re still a long way from our goals.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • U.S.
    The Root

    Capitol Insurrectionist Suspect Flees to Kenya, Is Deported Back to America to Face Justice

    The arrogance of white people never ceases to amaze me.

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  • Celebrity
    Yahoo Life

    Sharon Stone stuns in black bustier ahead of her 63rd birthday: 'Va va voom'

    The actress, who turns 63 on March 10, soaks up the sun in her sultry shoot.

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  • News
    Dr. Phil CBS

    Woman Says She’s At Odds With Mother-In-Law Over Letting Her Incapacitated Husband Die At Home In Peace

    “My husband, Josh, attempted suicide November 2, 2018. He used his shoestring to hang himself,” says Maegan. “He was brought to the hospital. He was still breathing, so he was in a coma. They said, basically, he’s in a vegetative state.” Maegan claims that Josh’s condition has worsened, and she sees more decline, so she says it’s time she lets him pass away peacefully. However, her mother-in-law, Kelly, says Josh should remain alive. “I was trying to bring Josh home about a month ago. Kelly threatened to take legal action, and hospice would not admit him,” Maegan says. “Kelly wants to keep Josh alive for her comfort. She’s being selfish and vindictive toward me.” Maegan shares the circumstances surrounding Josh’s suicide attempt and why she believes Josh wouldn’t want to live in his current state in the video above. However, Kelly claims her son would want to keep fighting to stay alive. On Monday’s episode of Dr. Phil, "'It's Time to Let My Husband Peacefully Pass Away,'" hear why Kelly says she believes Maegan wants to allow Josh to die – and why she believes he should be kept alive. Plus, brain specialist Dr. Daniel Amen shares his thoughts about Josh’s condition. Check local listings to see where you can tune in. TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY:A family/relationship divided?

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