• Politics
    Refinery29

    Michael Cohen’s New Book Accuses Trump Of “Cheating” In The Last Election

    Michael Cohen, former lawyer and fixer to President Donald Trump released the foreword of his upcoming tell-all book, Disloyal, about his behind the scenes dealings for the president on Thursday. Describing Trump as “a cheat, a liar, a fraud,” to name a few, Cohen promises his upcoming book will shed light on the president’s shady business dealings, including allegations that Trump cheated to win the 2016 election. “I know where the skeletons are buried because I was the one who buried them,” writes Cohen, who spent a lot of time with Trump behind closed doors and set up his communications with Russian President Vladimir Putin.  “Trump had colluded with the Russians, but not in the sophisticated ways imagined by his detractors,” Cohen claims. “Trump had cheated in the election, with Russian connivance, as you will discover in these pages, because doing anything — and I mean anything — to ‘win’ has always been his business model and way of life.” This might sound familiar, as Trump has long been accused of colluding with Russians during the 2016 election. Now, four years later, voting rights for millions of Americans are under attack, as in-person polling places shut down in counties nationwide while Trump is starving the US Postal Service of the resources it needs to ensure mail-in voting, with just ten weeks until the election. And Cohen’s tell-all — coming at the heels of his prison sentence — is reinvigorating a demand for answers.The White House responded to Cohen’s upcoming book calling it “fan fiction.” White House deputy press secretary Brian Morgenstern added, “[Cohen] readily admits to lying routinely but expects people to believe him now so that he can make money from book sales.” Americans watched the investigation into the president’s 2016 win unfold over two years as his opponents in Congress launched an investigation into possible Russian interference in the election. While the president repeatedly told the American public there was no collusion and that he had no dealings with Russia, Cohen writes, “He attempted to insinuate himself into the world of President Vladimir Putin and his coterie of corrupt billionaire oligarchs. I know because I personally ran that deal and kept Trump and his children closely informed of all updates.” But this isn’t the only bit of salacious information Trump’s former fixer is divulging. Cohen further outlines his own involvement in Trump’s affairs, saying that he doesn’t just know about them, but actively worked alongside the president to orchestrate and cover up his misdeeds. Cohen writes about his own involvement in snubbing contractors and business partners on Trump’s behalf, and lying to Melania about the president’s sexual affairs. Despite once being Trump’s “pitbull and personal attorney,” as he describes himself, Cohen notes that while the president might have millions of Twitter followers and acquaintances, Trump also has no friends. Cohen, for his part, pleaded guilty in 2018 for campaign finance violations, among other infractions, including payments to two women who alleged having affairs with the president before he was elected. He was sentenced to three years in a minimum security prison, where he reportedly wrote the majority of his book on yellow legal pads. He has not yet revealed when the book will be published in-full, or who will be publishing it, though many — including government officials — anticipate the accounts he details to be a possible great impact on the upcoming election.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?The Real Reason Michael Cohen Is Back In PrisonTrump Admits To Sabotaging Mail-In VotingTrump's Racist Appeal To "Suburban Housewives"

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  • U.S.
    USA TODAY

    Iowans grapple with aftermath of Monday's deadly derecho, 'a disaster that we have never seen'

    The National Guard arrived in Cedar Rapids on Friday to assist residents there after Monday's deadly derecho storm that was like a hurricane

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  • U.S.
    Eat This, Not That!

    Dr. Fauci Just Warned of This 'Very Disturbing' COVID Symptom

    Fever or chills, dry cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, loss of sense of smell and taste. These are just a few of the scary symptoms that people infected with COVID-19 are reporting. Usually it takes a few weeks—or even more than a month—for these manifestations of the highly infectious virus to subside. Most people do get better. However, there are some people who are battling symptoms of the virus log after the infection subsides, a phenomenon that Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, deems "very disturbing." He's Concerned for 'Long-Haulers'During an Instagram interview with actor and UT Austin Professor Matthew McConaughe on Thursday, the NIH Director expressed his concern about what the group of people the medical world has come to describe as "long haulers." "We're starting to see more and more people who apparently recover from the actual viral part of it, and then weeks later, they feel weak, they feel tired, they feel sluggish, they feel short of breath," Fauci, a key member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, explained. Read all 98 Symptoms Coronavirus Patients Say They've Had right here."It's a chronic projection forward of symptoms, even though the virus is gone, and we think that's probably an immunological effect."RELATED: The CDC Just Announced You Shouldn't Wear These MasksHe admitted that although health experts are researching the phenomenon and learning more about it every week, they are still puzzled why some people are left with these puzzling symptoms, while others make a complete recovery. "It's very disturbing, because if this is true for a lot of people, then just recovering from this may not be OK."  The CDC Confirms His WorriesIn late July, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a report confirming that thirty-five percent of coronavirus sufferers surveyed by the agency were still experiencing its wrath two to three weeks after testing positive for the virus. An interesting aspect of their study is that they only surveyed individuals with the virus who hadn't been admitted into a hospital, signifying a seemingly milder infection. Additionally, those who reported lingering symptoms weren't just older people. 26% of those between the ages of 18 to 34 and 32% of those 35 to 49 reported longer term symptoms. "COVID-19 can result in prolonged illness even among persons with milder outpatient illness, including young adults," the report's authors wrote. Until a vaccine is widely available, do everything you can to prevent getting—and spreading—COVID-19: Wear a face mask, get tested if you think you have coronavirus, avoid crowds (and bars, and house parties), practice social distancing, only run essential errands, wash your hands regularly, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 37 Places You're Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus.

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  • Celebrity
    In The Know

    Couple causes rift in family over 'appalling' parenting decision: 'They think we are messing up the child'

    “You’re setting your kid up for a childhood of mockery and torment.”

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  • U.S.
    National Review

    Oregon State Police Withdraws from Portland Courthouse after D.A. Announces He Won’t Prosecute Most Rioters

    Oregon state police are backing out of an agreement to protect the Portland federal courthouse from rioters, after the Multnomah County district attorney announced he will not prosecute most rioters who are arrested.Portland has seen riots almost every night since the May death of George Floyd, an African American man killed during his arrest by Minneapolis police officers. Rioters initially targeted the federal courthouse in the city, but after federal and state law enforcement came to an agreement to jointly protect the courthouse, rioters moved on to attack city police.Multnomah County D.A. Mike Schmidt announced on Tuesday that his office would not prosecute most rioters who have been arrested, except where charges include deliberate property damage, theft, or threat of violence. Police have arrested over 500 people since the riots began, but less than 50 have been prosecuted so far.Oregon state police told KOIN 6 on Thursday that they are ending their deployment at Portland's federal courthouse because of anger over Schmidt's decision after being called in to assist as part of the agreement reached between local authorities and the federal government.“The Oregon State Police is continually reassessing our resources and the needs of our partner agencies and at this time we are inclined to move those resources back to counties where prosecution of criminal conduct is still a priority," OSP said in a statement.Governor Kate Brown said the withdrawal was being coordinated between all relevant agencies."This transition was made in coordination with local and federal officials," Brown wrote on Twitter. "If further state support is needed in Portland, OSP troopers will be available to return to the city.""The OSP Troopers assigned to this event demonstrated the best traditions of the agency's commitment to service, however, our initial commitment to the City of Portland has concluded and it is time we integrate this valuable resource back to their respective communities," OSP said in a statement to National Review. "OSP will always be here for Portland, as we have for decades and I'll continue to assess subsequent resource demands with the Portland Police Bureau Chief, whom I have a great deal of respect for and a strong working relationship."

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